MFNERC would like to congratulate Kimberley Moors, Gabrielle Peterson, and Trevor Wilson for graduating with their Masters in Occupational Therapy. The Training Institute hosted a potluck and cake to celebrate the graduates after their convocation ceremony.

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Author : Nicole Magne

Lorne C Keeper Photo Credit Nicole Magne

“They’re coming out,” says Wilfred Buck. “They’re starting to come out.”

It’s a freezing cold night on the shore of Lake Winnipeg in rural Manitoba, Canada, and we are waiting for the stars. It’s early May, but I’m wearing three sweaters and huddled next to a crackling, popping campfire, listening to Buck tell us the stories behind constellations I’ve never heard of until tonight.

“Right below the grandmother spider is the Pleiades, the seven sisters,” says Buck. “And that’s called Pakone Kisik. The hole in the sky. And the hole in the sky is where we come from.”

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Wilfred is Cree, also known as Ininew, one of Canada’s largest First Nations groups. He’s telling us stories he’s gathered from indigenous communities across Manitoba—like how the Star Woman saw Earth from another dimension, fell through the hole in the sky, and became the first human on this planet.

“We come from the stars,” Buck says.

When most of us look at the night sky, we’re used to seeing stories not of indigenous origin, but of Greek or Roman: Andromeda chained to a rock, Perseus staring down a sea monster, Hercules slaying a lion. But just as the people of early Western civilizations looked to the stars and told stories about them, so did indigenous people around the world. In North American communities, the stars hold bears, sweat lodges, thunderbirds, and more.

Some of those stories are part of how indigenous people made sense of the world around them—a form of science separate from, but with kinship to, the enterprise of observation, prediction, and questioning built around what we call the scientific method.

“We come from the stars.”

Wilfred Buck
2 girls

“Astronomy was really cool, because I’m obsessed with the stars,” says Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh and her classmates are exactly the kinds of students you’d want pursuing STEM degrees. And yet Jessie says she feels like she won’t fit into the way science is done.

“I don’t want to do Western science,” she says. “I don’t want to have to write everything down all the time. I keep it in my head because it’s in my blood to do that, you know?” 

In 2012, the Obama administration set a goal of increasing STEM undergraduate degrees by 1 million to meet growing economic and technology needs in the next decade. But how do you recruit that many young scientists? And how do you invite everyone—like Kavanaugh and her classmates—who feels left out? Pantalony says broadening the image of science—and who does it—is a first step. He recommends giving credit to more non-Western scientists, both past and present—not to mention looking beyond the stereotypes of lab coats, test tubes, and particle accelerators.

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Two-day sessions promoting: networking, information sharing and other professional development that will enhance literacy strategies to implement in the classroom.

We ask you to designate one ELA school teacher from your school to participate in the two-day roundtables.

Continue reading “Invitation to High School and Middle Years ELA Round Tables”
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MFNERC’s Training Initiatives is dedicated to the success of three First Nations students who are completing their Master of Science in Community Disorders: Speech-Language Pathology at Minot State University, North Dakota.

Continue reading “Minot State University teams up with MFNERC to deliver Speech Pathology training to First Nations students”
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Youth 1st Lacrosse is an organization that delivers programming to Indigenous communities in Manitoba. MFNSS is in partnership with Youth 1st Lacrosse, bringing Canada’s national summer sport to 10 schools that are part of the school system.

Continue reading “Lacrosse in York Factory”
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The Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre is proud to host the annual First Nations Circle of Knowledge & Practices Conference. This year’s theme was “Language, Land, and Learning.”

Continue reading “Circle of Knowledge and Practices 2019”
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The MFNERC Annual Report is an overview of the successes and challenges of the services to First Nations schools.

We have a strong history of providing these innovative services to the First Nations we serve, and continue to build on that experience to support the educational success of our children.

We work to support students with an education based on a foundation of languages and cultures and a philosophy of lifelong learning. 

We look to member First Nations to help set our direction the path to success for our children to thrive and gain inspiration for the good and fulfilling life.

Continue reading “2018-2019 Annual Report”
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Coinciding with National Truth and Reconciliation Day, AMC and MFNERC hosted the Manitoba First Nations Languages Land-Based Gathering geared towards students from First Nations reserves and Grades Seven and Eight students in Winnipeg. One group travelled from Tataskweyak Cree Nation to participate in the two-day event.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 3, 2019 

Winnipeg, Mb. – Two highly regarded First Nations educational organizations, The Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre (MFNERC) and Yellowquill College, have formally amalgamated. This merge will provide First Nations-led education from Early Learning through Post-Secondary. 

Continue reading “MFNERC and Yellowquill College Merge to Create a First Nations Post-Secondary Institution”

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