2019 Workshop Descriptions

Workshops

DAY 1

Monday March 4, 2019

 

Enhancing Children’s Learning Thorough Play

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (70 max)                                                   Centennial 5

Presenter: Marjorie Kostelnik

In this workshop we will translate the power of play into useful early childhood learning strategies. You will learn more about the different kinds of play and how to support each type; how you can vary your teaching behaviors to match children’s learning needs; and, how you can fit play into your busy routines. We will also address some of the common ‘play problems’ children and teachers experience and then explore ways to address these challenges. This will be a practical session that will incorporate play as a means to illustrate its necessity to children’s development.

 

Self-Regulation in the Early Years: What it is and why it Matters

Session 1:  Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                      Centennial 7, 8, 9, 10

Presenter: Dr. Susan Hopkins

This workshop will focus on Self-Regulation in the Early Years – What It Is and Why It Matters. Dr. Hopkins will share how decades of research show that self-regulation is a cornerstone of healthy child development and well-being. She’ll explain the difference between self-regulation and self-control and how stress affects children (and adults) across five domains of functioning. You’ll learn how the self-regulation framework, which is a process rather than a program, can help professionals support and enhance self-regulation in children, parents and caregivers.

 

The Smell of Water: Using Five Senses and Mindfulness to Connect with the Natural World

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (20 max)                                       Centennial 2a

Presenter: Barret Miller

Participants will learn concrete techniques and activities to help K-3 learners engage with the natural world using their five senses.  This connection helps children grow in appreciation and love for the natural world.

A short discussion of the impact of nature on the senses of a developing child will be followed by an exercise isolating each sense in turn to connect with the space we’re in.  This will be followed by games and activities (using props such as popsicle sticks and a cowbell) that can be used as fun ways to remind children to use and pay attention to all their senses.

Connecting a child to their own senses, which are then used to connect deeply to nature, certainly nurtures that child’s growing spirit.

 

Sharing our Stories

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (25)                                                           Embassy E

Presenters: Arlene Flatfoot; Dave Rundle

Participants will be able to review and practice read alouds of age appropriate books about Indian Residential Schools. Participants will then have an opportunity to create various Orange Shirt Day activities to promote awareness among children about the Indian residential school system and the impact this system had on Indigenous communities for more than a century in Canada.

 Participants will create their activity and share with the group.

 

Nurture Your Spirit through the Power of Art

Sessions 1 & 2: Monday 1:00 pm – 3:45 pm (45)                                       Centennial 4

Presenter: Kisa MacIsaac

Have you heard the saying, “You must take care of yourself first so that you can take care of others”? Day after day of working with people – with children, families, and coworkers – can really cause one’s “cup” to feel empty. It can be a challenge to find that balance and to keep our cups filled up, so that we can continue to pour that energy out, day after day, in the important work we do in early learning!

Come join your peers in this hands-on workshop as we remind ourselves about the importance of self-care – of nurturing your own spirit so that you may do the same for those around you.  We will engage in self-reflection, brainstorm new ideas, and learn some new tools to draw from – including the healing power of art as you create your own work of art using paint on canvas.

In the first half of this workshop, we will talk about healing from a traditional perspective and will touch on some teachings of the Medicine Wheel – using it as a visual way to check in with how we are doing – emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually – exploring a new way to find that “balance” we all strive for – the balance that our ancestors understood so well.

Part II of the workshop is where we will embrace the healing method of “being creative”, as each participant will be guided through the process of letting go of fear and creating a unique and beautiful painting with courage and love. A work of art to take home (all materials provided), that will hopefully serve as a visual reminder to make time to do those things that fill your cup and nurture your spirit – whatever they may be – so that we can be our BEST for the children and families who need us to be there for them each day. Aprons provided – come for a relaxing, interesting, unique and fun workshop where we will nurture our spirit through the healing power of art! The hope is that you will come away feeling energized with some new ideas for personal wellness, so that we can continue to be the best educators we can be.

 

Baby/Toddler/Preschool Sign Language

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (25)                                               Embassy D

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (25)                                               Embassy D

Presenters: Emil Easter; Vernon Jebb

Communication is the key for learning. Early years children can learn signs before they can communicate verbally.

Teaching signs can help build expressive language skills for children who do not yet communicate verbally and decrease frustration for parents, caregivers and teachers. Signs can be used in the home, daycare, preschool and school. It is fun to learn how to Sign and it helps with 2nd language learning.

See https://youtu.be/hnq-XOaq1is – Grandmother teaching sign language

 

Recovering, Revitalization, and Restoring Our Families: Developing Resilience, Healing and Wellness, through Traditional Parenting

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (20)                                               Carlton Room

Presenters: Audrey Fourre; Holly Fontaine

Family Literacy Facilitator and IRC/Library Facilitator will present a hands-on, interactive workshop for participants on traditional parenting and the roles of parents.  The historical significance of the Moss Bag, will be shared, in relation to fostering a healthy sense of self in children.  The session will discuss resiliency, self-regulation from an Aboriginal perspective and how parenting programs can support healing and wellness.  The MFNERC GIFT guide and family literacy programs will be showcased, while participants will experience making mini-traveling Moss Bags that they can make with their students in the classroom.

The workshop will include many of the developmental domains- physical, social/emotional, and cognitive, such as cutting, taking turns, sharing, discussing, following directions, selecting materials, and making choices.

 

Oral Tradition Teaches us about Life on the Land!

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                                   Embassy B

Judy Doolittle; James Queskekapow; Don Monkman

Introduction: Land Based Education with Early Years on storytelling where legends and stories depict morals and teachings to live harmoniously with each other, where we learn to care for the land, where we learn to care for the water, and all living things.

Methods: An opportunity for Land Based Education to be inclusive of storytelling where the stories can be shared and a time to reflect on knowledge gained from communities with a story teller and an artist demonstrating the visuals as the story is being told.

Results: Story telling informs the audience the importance of oral tradition for enjoyment, ways of knowing, values, and most of all healing for our communities.

Conclusion: Stories and legends are captivating and enjoyable – allow them to take you on a picturesque ride in your imagination as the artist draws to demonstrate this as the story unfolds.

 

School Bus Safety

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (40)                                               Embassy C

Presenter: Ralph Arthurson

School bus safety is important for everyone. In this workshop, the presenter will provide an overview of school bus safety. Topics will include danger zones around a school bus, safe boarding and exiting a school bus and safe ridership policies.

If everyone does their part, we can ensure children get to school safely.

 

Everyday Yoga for Kids

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (60)                                               Centennial 6

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (60)                                               Centennial 6

Presenter: Bryanna Spina

Children are in constant movement and their senses are always responding to their internal and external environments. Often, children need guidance to translate emotions that arise and through deliberate movement, play and mindfulness, a child’s energy can be directed and channeled into positive learning. Through sharing these tools, we are modelling a behavior that values self-care, empathy for others and stewardship of our environment. Children and educators will grow together and learn how to co-create sustainable life practices.

 

Playdough Power

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                                   Centennial 3

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                                                   Centennial 3

Presenter:  Volunteer ECE II students

Playdough supports children’s development and learning in all developmental domains. Playdough also encourages children’s language and literacy, science and math skills. In this come and go workshop, participants will explore various playdough stations and experience firsthand how playdough supports children’s development and learning. Participants will also gain new ideas for props and materials that can enhance playdough play.

 

 

Block Bonanza

Session 1: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                                   Centennial 2

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                                                   Centennial 2

Presenter:  Volunteer ECE II students

This come and go workshop, is inspired by blocks…all types of blocks, in large amounts, with all kinds of accessories to encourage block play in various play zones. Come and play and learn how block play contributes to all domains of children’s development, the stages of block play children progress through, and how you can facilitate children’s play with blocks.

 

Developing Conceptual Understanding of Number through Conversation

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (30)                                               Embassy C

Presenters: Brenda Delorme; Bonnie Monias

Recent research indicates that children begin to construct number sense very early in life. Some toddlers as young as 18 months and nearly all 2-year-olds have begun learning the developmental prerequisites for fact fluency.  In this workshop participants will be introduced to visuals that help develop the conceptual understanding of number by:

  1. Engaging students in conversation about their thinking and learning.
  2. Promoting the use of mental math strategies.
  3. Encouraging the use of mathematical language.

 

 

 

 

 

Play is the Work of Children

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (40)                                               Embassy B

Presenters: Kelly Ring-Whiklo; Susan Janzen

Epic adventures, fighting evil forces, learning the lessons of Nanabush or Wesakechak; these are all elements of a good story. We often think of stories as being read or told, but an important component of learning stories, is acting them out through play. How can we foster the development of narrative skills and a love of stories through play? This workshop aims to discuss the links between narrative skills and play, and it will also provide practical strategies for encouraging the use of stories and oral literature to guide play.

 

Early Literacy through Play and Relationships

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (75)                                               Centennial 5

Presenter: Debra Mayer

How do early childhood teachers support young children’s emerging interest in reading and writing by using developmentally appropriate play-based approaches?

Through a child-centered approach that honors children’s relationships with families, peers and teachers, consider how to create a print-rich, playful learning environment that encourages children’s oral language, reading, drawing, and writing and helps support successful literacy transition into Grade One and beyond.

 

Animation in TYNKER

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (24)                                               Centennial 2a

Presenter: Alberto Mansilla

Supporting children’s STEM development doesn’t mean you have to be an expert. What we can do is to encourage our own children’s curiosity thus instilling in them the motivation to explore and experiment. This is how they learn to be inquisitive, which is the foundation of the scientific method.

Tynker features animated software which helps users to create animated movie, design artwork and build stories. Children can use this software to create animated stories using stock characters which can be modified or they can upload their own pictures and add their own voices.

 

 

Early Learning and Attachment:  Understanding the Importance of Attachment and the Connection to Social-Emotional Learning and Relationships

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                                  Centennial 7, 8, 9, 10

Presenter: Mindy Sinclair

What is attachment and why is it important to educators?  What does it have to do with social emotional development and the way that children learn grow and develop?

Young children learn from their interactions with others and the environment around them.  They learn to step away from their caregivers and explore their world, take risks and learn because of the attachments they have developed as infants, toddlers, preschoolers and beyond.  When that attachment bond isn’t in place, when trauma such as emotional abuse or neglect is experienced it has an effect on how the brain develops.  This workshop will allow educators to learn more about the importance of attachment and discuss ways to build trusting environments, where children can grow, learn and thrive.

 

Puppetry 101: Making and Using Puppets

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (30 max)                                                   Embassy E

Presenters: Colleen Anderson; Laura Ellen Elliott

In this workshop, the participants will learn how to make and use puppets from items they have at home.  This workshop will provide participants with a basic understanding of puppetry and identify various ideas on how to make different types of puppets. This workshop will give teachers the tools they need to help nurture the spirit of the developing child. 

 

Balancing our Being

Session 2: Monday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                            Carlton Room

Presenter: Cecilia Baker

This workshop will focus on the four components of the essence of life including; the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual parts of our being.  Through an active approach, participants will do 5 minutes of mindfulness based stress reduction and/or meditation activity (participants may need a mat or blanket to lay on the floor or be in a seated position – laying position is preferable).

Participants will also learn self-care strategies – 5 areas and examples (group work with ice breaker and coming up with strategies).  Teaching about the medicine wheel and applying the four components of our being – outcome to find balance.

 

 

 

DAY 2

 

Parents in the Education Process

Session 3:  Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                          Centennial 7, 8, 9, 10

Presenter:  Dr. Debbie Pushor

This workshop will focus on demonstrating that when school personnel walk alongside parents, intersecting children’s schooling with their education, everyone benefits: children, parents, and teachers. Schools become both richer and safer places for children as the children benefit from the combined efforts of all the adults in their lives working together toward the enhancement of their learning and care.

 

Recovering, Revitalization, and Restoring Our Families: Developing Resilience, Healing and Wellness, through Traditional Parenting

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (20)                                               Carlton Room

Presenters: Audrey Fourre; Holly Fontaine

Family Literacy Facilitator and IRC/Library Facilitator will present a hands-on, interactive workshop for participants on traditional parenting and the roles of parents.  The historical significance of the Moss Bag, will be shared, in relation to fostering a healthy sense of self in children.  The session will discuss resiliency, self-regulation from an Aboriginal perspective and how parenting programs can support healing and wellness.  The MFNERC GIFT guide and family literacy programs will be showcased, while participants will experience making mini-traveling Moss Bags that they can make with their students in the classroom.

The workshop will include many of the developmental domains- physical, social/emotional, and cognitive, such as cutting, taking turns, sharing, discussing, following directions, selecting materials, and making choices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Playdough Power

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                                   Centennial 3

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                                                   Centennial 3

Presenter:  Volunteer ECE II students

Playdough supports children’s development and learning in all developmental domains. Playdough also encourages children’s language and literacy, science and math skills. In this come and go workshop, participants will explore various playdough stations and experience firsthand how playdough supports children’s development and learning. Participants will also gain new ideas for props and materials that can enhance playdough play.

 

Block Bonanza

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm                                                                   Centennial 2

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                                                                   Centennial 2

Presenter:  Volunteer ECE II students

This come and go workshop, is inspired by blocks…all types of blocks, in large amounts, with all kinds of accessories to encourage block play in various play zones. Come and play and learn how block play contributes to all domains of children’s development, the stages of block play children progress through, and how you can facilitate children’s play with blocks.

 

What Play Looks Like and Looking at Children’s Progress through 5 Social Levels of Play

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (60)                                               Carlton Room          

Presenters: Desiree Houle; Jessica Chisolm

WHAT DOES PLAY LOOK LIKE? As educators, how do you promote the importance of play in your classroom? In this workshop, participants will look at the five social levels of play and how the developmental progression of play is emphasized in the interaction with materials, their own body and the environment. We will discuss planning for play and how setting up the classroom to be inviting, creative and the opportunity for children to explore. We will have a hands on activity with the emphasis on discovery and to explore your own creativity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Literacy through Play and Relationships

Session 4: Tuesday 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm (75)                                               Centennial 5

Presenter: Debra Mayer

How do early childhood teachers support young children’s emerging interest in reading and writing by using developmentally appropriate play-based approaches?

Through a child-centered approach that honors children’s relationships with families, peers and teachers, consider how to create a print-rich, playful learning environment that encourages children’s oral language, reading, drawing, and writing and helps support successful literacy transition into Grade One and beyond.

 

Movement Mania                                                                                          Centennial 6

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 – 2:15

Session 4 Tuesday 2:45 – 4:00

Presenter: Room will be monitored by volunteer ECE II students

To encourage healthy growth and development, young children need support from adults that allows for an active lifestyle. Young children should participate in a range of developmentally appropriate, enjoyable, and safe play-based and organized physical activities in a variety of environments. Join us in discovering and engaging in fun movement activities and games you can play with children.

 

Risky Play: Embracing Risky Play in Childhood

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (25)                                                           Centennial 5

Presenter: Melinda Walden

From the time children can move, they have an innate motivation to take risks. As they continue to grow, children want and need more risk taking opportunities in order to develop self-esteem, confidence and independence.  Yet, we have entered an era of “helicopter parenting” and “being as safe as possible” where children are being stopped from testing out their abilities and taking appropriate risks. This has a lifelong effect on overall child development. Let’s be the change for our children. Let’s embrace risky play and give children back their independence.

This workshop will answer: What is risky play? What happens when we restrict children’s play?  What are the benefits of trusting your children to take risks? How can you help children learn to assess and manage risk? How can you incorporate risky play into your child care program/home?

The presentation talks about how risky play is important for self-esteem, self-efficacy and self-worth and building resiliency in children of all ages. There will be a hands on rough and tumble play activity with pool noodles and fly swatters.

 

A Light on Curriculum

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (32)                                               Embassy B

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (32)                                               Embassy B

Presenters: Brian Harrison; Karen Riediger

The developing child discovers and makes sense of their world through hands-on interactions with their surroundings. Light is often one of those early discoveries that inspires a child’s natural curiosity. This hands-on session combines these two ideas: hands-on learning and light as an inspiration for curriculum.

Using a variety of light sources (e.g., overhead projector, flashlights, data projector, light table, light cube, work lights) participants will experience and reflect on opportunities that can illuminate curriculum in fresh and exciting ways that are relevant to the hands-on learning of their young students.

 

Education Outcomes Associated with Full Day Kindergarten among First Nations Children: A Retrospective Administrative Database Cohort Study

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (Kindergarten 40)                                   Embassy C

Presenters: Marni Brownell; Nora Murdock; Kim O’Laney

Introduction: The quality of early education children receive influences their developmental trajectories, with long-term effects extending into adulthood. First Nations children face many structural barriers to academic success. Few studies have examined the impact of education programs on removing these barriers to support better outcomes amongst First Nations children.

Objective and Methods: We examined educational outcomes associated with full-day (FDK) versus half-day (HDK) kindergarten among First Nations children using data from the Manitoba Population Research Data Repository. We linked children’s education records with the Manitoba Health Registry and the First Nations Registry to identify all First Nations children who attended kindergarten in a Winnipeg school division (1998-2011). Children enrolled in FDK were age- and sex- matched to children enrolled in HDK. Propensity scores were used to adjust for confounding control. Outcomes included academic achievements in grades 3, 7, and 8 and high school graduation. We used generalized linear models to test for differences in education outcomes.

Results: We identified 324 First Nations children enrolled in FDK and 595 matches in HDK in the study period. FDK was associated with improved grade 3 outcomes in reading and math. However, these improvements dissipated over time; once children reached grade 7, associated improvements disappeared.

Conclusion: FDK is associated with improved outcomes up to grade 3. This suggests that education programs, such as FDK, can have a positive impact on First Nations education outcomes; however, these types of supports must continue throughout a child’s education journey to ensure that positive gains are not lost. Future research is needed to identify the types of programs that can be offered through elementary, middle, and high school to enable children to continue to succeed in school.

 

Integrating First Nation Language Instruction into Classroom Daily Routines Using Music, Movement Activities and Games

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (30)                                               Embassy D

Presenter: Wanda Barker

Knowing one’s First Nation’s language is an intrinsic part of a First nation’s cultural identity. However, there has been a major disruption in being able to pass on the language to each successive generation due to colonization and assimilative policies and practices. The workshop will present some strategies and resources that can be utilized to integrate learning the basics of the Anishinaabemowin/Ojibwe language into the classroom. The workshop will focus partly on a presentation and discussion on suggested routines to integrate First Nation language learning. This will be followed by active, hands-on learning of basic Anishinaabemowin using songs, puppets, circle activities and games.

 

Animotetan, Let’s Talk “Opikiwawasowin”- Taking Care of our Children in a Cree Conversation

Session 3: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (20)                                               Centennial 2a

Presenter: George Ross; Sandy Robinson

Workshop registrants will participate in a Nehinawaywin- Conversation Circle to share ideas, thoughts, stories, and teachings about Opikiwawasowin (parenting-child raising). Traditional ways of raising our children built a solid foundation. Minoyawin (wellness) is the ultimate goal so all members can contribute to a healthy and prosperous community (mino-pimatisiwin).

Participants are encouraged to share their stories in the Cree language to capture the “Heart of the Matter” of their thoughts. Our languages capture the very essence of our traditional ways of doing things.

 

 

Sharing our Stories

Session 3: Monday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm (25)                                                           Embassy E

Presenters: Arlene Flatfoot; Dave Rundle

Participants will be able to review and practice read alouds of age appropriate books about Indian Residential Schools. Participants will then have an opportunity to create various Orange Shirt Day activities to promote awareness among children about the Indian residential school system and the impact this system had on Indigenous communities for more than a century in Canada.  Participants will create their activity and share with the group.

 

Trauma-Informed Care

Sessions 3 & 4: Tuesday 1:00 pm – 3:45 pm                                                          Centennial 4

Nadia LaRosa and Vycki Atallah

This introductory half-day workshop explores what trauma is, the principles of Trauma Informed Care and how to integrate a trauma-informed perspective into our everyday interactions. Included in the session are mindfulness practices and the opportunity for self-reflection.

 

This workshop is geared for service providers, students, front line staff, clinicians, management and anyone else who is interested in incorporating the principles of Trauma Informed Care.

 

 

Centres de la Petite Enfance et Famille (Early Childhood and Family Centers)

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (30)                                               Centennial 2a

Presenters: Joanne Colliou; Rene Dequier

La Coalition francophone de la petite enfance du Manitoba offers support to families as children’s first educators to its children to acquire skills and social development needed for success in school and beyond. La Fédération des parents du Manitoba (Parents association), the Division scolaire franco-manitobaine and other community partners work together to offer activities for children and families in a school setting. Workshop will describe how research is applied in a minority language setting.

 

 

 

 

 

Total Physical Response and Language Learning in Young Children

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (40)                                               Embassy D

Presenter: Agnes Carlson

2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages; it is time to bring our languages home to our grandchildren, to share our language and culture.   We are seeing an important shift in language efforts across our First Nation communities.  Back home, we hear the little children speaking Dene Yatie in some of the homes, they are taking part in cultural activities at school, and are introduced to language apps, to help in their learning.

At this workshop, the presenter will share language learning strategies when teaching early childhood. The method of instruction will be on Total Physical Response (TPR). TPR is one of the methods utilized in many classrooms and in the culture transmission; it works well when creating language script and in play activities; it allows a child to explore and learn about their world.  A child understands language long before she or he can talk; their senses are at work at this stage in language development.  The benefits of TPR teaches the young children to understand everyday language and gradually move into fluency levels.

 

Using Puppets in the Classroom

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (30)                                               Embassy C

Presenters: Colleen Anderson; Laura Ellen Elliott

Our intention is to help the participants realize that they can use puppets in various ways in the classroom. This will help their students develop language, social skills, imagination, storytelling, retention of information, aids in academic learning such as letters, numbers and learning other languages.  This nurtures the spirit of the developing child.

 

Publishing your Story

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm                   Centennial 7, 8, 9, 10 (South Centennial)

Presenter: David Robertson

This workshop will go over the process through which your story or classroom story can get published by working with the Publishing & Communications Unit at the MFNERC. The workshop will also talk about publishing in general.

 

 

 

Kindergarten Teachers: Meeting Social Studies Learning Outcomes with First Nations Studies Focus

Session 4: Tuesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm (Kindergarten 20)                                   Embassy E

Presenter: Donna Beyer

MFNERC First Nations Studies facilitator, Donna Beyer, will provide an overview of drafted document, First Nations Studies: Suggested Topics for Kindergarten Social Studies Curriculum. This draft booklet is intended to support teachers who wish to focus on First Nations Studies while meeting social studies learning outcomes. Presenter will provide an overview of the booklet, its content, suggested lessons, and resources.

 

 

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